Category: Methodologies

Microlearning is a disruptive learning strategy which goes way beyond content chunking. Microlearning is not a technological solution; it is a learning strategy and needs to be implemented as one.
Last February 14th, I had the pleasure and the honor to be invited by Netex to their i-love learning event. I was asked to talk about our journey of Santander to become a learning organization, as a key enabler of the strategic aim to transform ourselves into the “best open
Large organisations are empowering middle managers to help people in their professional development and defining their own goals in terms of performance. These practices require coaching to help people in the short term and in the medium term.
Behavioural change is the biggest indicator of successful learning and is the hardest to achieve. In the case of soft skills training, compliance training, even sales training, a behavioural change should be the expected output and not just completion of the training.
While many organizations have moved away from the paradigm of vertical management and move towards flatter management structures and greater involvement with the business line, in most companies I know, the L&D departments still maintain exclusive control and leadership of the entire process of training and learning within the company.
Some day you have to implement a change. This can be within a company, in your family or in a community of neighbors. If the change is very desired, you may not have much resistance. The problem arises when the rest do not see or understand the problem or when
The late and legendary author of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams once said, “A learning experience is one of those things that says, ‘You know that thing you just did? Don’t do that.”
But what exactly constitutes microlearning, beyond content delivered in 1-5 minutes bursts? Microlearning was conceived as a solution for just-in-time training and performance support. But it can also be applied to long term learning programmes. Exponents claim that delivering learning content in bite-size chunks and drip feeding it over
“Consumerisation is the specific impact that consumer-originated technologies can have on enterprises. It reflects how enterprises will be affected by, and can take advantage of, new technologies and models that originate and develop in the consumer space, rather than in the enterprise IT sector.”
Structural gamification’s continual, real-time assessment of progress provides important information to both the learner and the administrators as learners complete portions of content, take quizzes to gauge knowledge acquisition and move toward the prescribed educational goals. The continual assessment of progress helps identify strengths and weaknesses.

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